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HuroCup: competition for multi-event humanoid robot athletes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2016

Jacky Baltes
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3T-2N2 e-mail: jacky@cs.umanitoba.ca, andersj@cs.umanitoba.ca
Kuo-Yang Tu
Affiliation:
Institute of System Information and Control Address, National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology, 2, Juoyue Road, Nantzi, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan 811, Republic of China e-mail: tuky@nkfust.edu.tw
Soroush Sadeghnejad
Affiliation:
Amirkabir Robotic Institute, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), No. 424, Hafez Ave., P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Iran e-mail: s.sadeghnejad@aut.ac.ir
John Anderson
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3T-2N2 e-mail: jacky@cs.umanitoba.ca, andersj@cs.umanitoba.ca

Abstract

This paper describes the motivation for the development of the HuroCup competition and follows the rule development from its inaugural competition from 2002 to 2015. The history of HuroCup is broken down into its growing phase (2002–2006), a time of explosive growth (2007–2011), and current times. This paper describes the main research focus of HuroCup, the multi-event humanoid robot competition: (a) active balancing, (b) complex motion planning, and (c) human–robot interaction and shows how the various HuroCup events relate to those research topics. This paper concludes with some medium- and long-term goals of the rule development for HuroCup.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press, 2017 

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References

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