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Kant’s Political Zweckmässigkeit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2015

Dilek Huseyinzadegan*
Affiliation:
Emory University
*Corresponding

Abstract

While Kant’s political writings employ a teleological language, the exact benefit of such language to his politics is far from clear. Against recent interpretations of Kant’s political thought, which downplay or dismiss the role of teleology, I restore Zweckmässigkeit to its place in Kant’s politics as a theoretically and practically useful material principle, and show that a teleological perspective complements the perspective stipulated by the formal principle of Recht. By means of a systematic reconstruction of what I call ‘political Zweckmässigkeit’, we gain a fuller portrayal of and a valuable insight into Kant’s political thought.

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Articles
Copyright
© Kantian Review 2015 

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