Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-2jsqd Total loading time: 0.141 Render date: 2021-06-21T18:08:17.839Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

An Early Eocene gecko from Baltic amber and its implications for the evolution of gecko adhesion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2005

Aaron M. Bauer
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085, U.S.A.
Wolfgang Böhme
Affiliation:
Zoologisches Forschungsinstitut und Museum Alexander Koenig, Adenauerallee 160, D-53113 Bonn, Germany
Wolfgang Weitschat
Affiliation:
Geologisch-Paläontologisches Institut und Museum der Universität Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany

Abstract

A new genus and species of gecko from the Lower Eocene of north-western Russia is described from a superbly preserved specimen in Baltic amber. It is the oldest gekkonid lizard to be represented by more than fragmentary skeletal remains. The digits of the specimen are mostly intact and reveal a unique combination of characters not seen in any living form. Expanded sub-digital scansors on the toes, however, are essentially similar to those of modern climbing geckos and verify the existence of a complex adhesive system 20–30 million years earlier than supported by previously discovered fossil geckos.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2005 The Zoological Society of London
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

An Early Eocene gecko from Baltic amber and its implications for the evolution of gecko adhesion
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

An Early Eocene gecko from Baltic amber and its implications for the evolution of gecko adhesion
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

An Early Eocene gecko from Baltic amber and its implications for the evolution of gecko adhesion
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *