Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-8tjh8 Total loading time: 0.172 Render date: 2021-10-21T22:20:19.113Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Response of territorial males to the threat of sneaking in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a field study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2003

Steven C. Le Comber
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.
Chris G. Faulkes
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.
Joana Formosinho
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.
Carl Smith
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.
Get access

Abstract

Alternative mating tactics are found in many species, and may have important implications for population genetics and speciation. The existence of such alternative mating tactics is well-documented in the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, and sneaking and egg-stealing may occur in a significant proportion of matings under natural conditions. Sneaking can impose high costs on territorial males, both in terms of reduced reproductive output and caring for unrelated offspring. We ask whether territorial males adjust their behaviour in response to the risk of sneaking. In a field study of three-spined sticklebacks on the Isle of Arran, Scotland, territorial males were presented with glass bottles containing either a male, a female or neither, to address whether territorial males were more aggressive to other males in the presence of a female, and whether territorial males courted females less in the presence of another male. Behavioural observations showed that territorial males did not behave more aggressively towards rival males in the presence of a female, but did reduce their rate of courtship towards females in the presence of rival males. We conclude that territorial males adopt behavioural strategies that may reduce their risk of reproductive parasitism.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 The Zoological Society of London

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Response of territorial males to the threat of sneaking in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a field study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Response of territorial males to the threat of sneaking in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a field study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Response of territorial males to the threat of sneaking in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a field study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *