Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-fmrbl Total loading time: 0.279 Render date: 2022-09-26T13:12:30.059Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Maximum dive depths of common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix) during the annual cycle at Mayes Island, Kerguelen

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2000

Pierrick Bocher
Affiliation:
Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, UPR 1934 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, F-79360 Villiers-en-Bois, France Laboratoire de Biologie et Environnement Marins, EA 1220 de l'Université de La Rochelle, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex, France
Bruno Labidoire
Affiliation:
Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, UPR 1934 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, F-79360 Villiers-en-Bois, France
Yves Cherel
Affiliation:
Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, UPR 1934 du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, F-79360 Villiers-en-Bois, France
Get access

Abstract

Maximum dive depths of common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix were measured monthly over > 1 year, from January 1995 to February 1996, with miniature gauges attached to the birds at Mayes Island, Kerguelen Archipelago. Overall, maximum dive depths of 347 diving petrels averaged 31 ± 6 m (range: 8–64 m), with a mode at 30–35 m. Mean maximum dive depths differed significantly over the study period. The lowest value (22 ± 8 m) was obtained in winter and it was associated with euphausiid crustaceans, suggesting a change in foraging behaviour associated with a shift in the main prey consumed. During the breeding season, birds fed mainly upon the hyperiid amphipod Themisto gaudichaudii (66% of the total number of prey), followed by the large carnivorous copepod Paraeuchaeta antarctica (15%) and zoea larvae of the crab Halicarcinus planatus (13%). Comparison of the diving capabilities of diving petrels (genus Pelecanoides) with those of other diving seabirds suggests that, relative to body mass, diving petrels can dive deeper than penguins and also possibly than alcids, and are thus the most proficient divers among birds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 The Zoological Society of London

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Maximum dive depths of common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix) during the annual cycle at Mayes Island, Kerguelen
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Maximum dive depths of common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix) during the annual cycle at Mayes Island, Kerguelen
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Maximum dive depths of common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix) during the annual cycle at Mayes Island, Kerguelen
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *