Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-jcwnq Total loading time: 0.154 Render date: 2021-10-23T06:04:49.161Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Enamel hypoplasia provides insights into early systemic stress in wild and captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2004

Tamara A. Franz-Odendaal
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch Private Bag 7700, South Africa
Get access

Abstract

Enamel hypoplasia, a developmental tooth defect, provides a permanent record of systemic stress during early life. The incidence and distribution of linear enamel hypoplasia has been used by anthropologists and palaeontologists to assess the health status of past populations but has not been applied by wildlife biologists studying extant animals. This study investigates enamel hypoplasia in 23 Giraffa camelopardalis skulls from wild and captive animals of various ages and sex to determine whether any systemic stress events are unique to life in captivity. Results indicate that wild giraffes are relatively stress-free as they do not have linear defects. Based on the distribution of linear defects in other giraffes, three key stress periods during the first 6 years of giraffe life were identified. The first stress event occurs during weaning, the second at about 3 years of age and the third, which is the least common, at 4–5 years of age. All three stress events were observed in both male and female giraffes. This study highlights the usefulness of assessing enamel hypoplasia in both wild and captive animals as well as the need for further research on tooth developmental timings in many wild ungulates. Some left–right asymmetry was observed in the development of linear and non-linear defects, which has implications for the aetiology of these defects.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2004 The Zoological Society of London

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Enamel hypoplasia provides insights into early systemic stress in wild and captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Enamel hypoplasia provides insights into early systemic stress in wild and captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Enamel hypoplasia provides insights into early systemic stress in wild and captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *