Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-zm8ws Total loading time: 0.186 Render date: 2021-06-15T14:47:54.395Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Seedling recruitment failure following dipterocarp mast fruiting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2004

Arthur G. Blundell
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 03755, USA Corresponding author. Current address: Diplomacy Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, USAID–Forestry Team, 3426 16th St NW #308, Washington, DC 20010, USA. Email: art.blundell@alum.dartmouth.org
David R. Peart
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 03755, USA

Abstract

Many rain-forest trees in South-East Asia, including the dominant canopy family Dipterocarpaceae, reproduce in gregarious mast-fruiting events once every 2–11 y (Ashton et al. 1988). The dominant hypothesis for the evolution of masting is that predators are incapable of consuming mast seed crops, so that natural selection has favoured parent trees that fruit in synchrony (Janzen 1974, 1976). Mast flowering and fruiting are visually spectacular and quantified in harvest records for dipterocarp species producing large, oil-rich tengkawang seeds (Curran et al. 1999). Seedling recruitment following a mast is less obvious and has no immediate commercial value. However, a number of pulses of recruitment have been documented (Ashton et al. 1988, Chan 1980, Fox 1972, Liew & Wong 1973). These, together with general acceptance of the satiation hypothesis, have led to the widespread assumption that masts reliably increase seedling density and generate distinct seedling cohorts (Whitmore 1998). Indeed, foresters in Malaysia and Indonesia often recommend harvesting only after a mast, to ensure high densities of seedling regeneration.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
2004 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.
12
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Seedling recruitment failure following dipterocarp mast fruiting
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Seedling recruitment failure following dipterocarp mast fruiting
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Seedling recruitment failure following dipterocarp mast fruiting
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *