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Seasonal patterns of fine-root productivity and turnover in a tropical savanna of northern Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2004

Xiaoyong Chen
Affiliation:
Cooperative Research Centre for the Sustainable Development of Tropical Savannas, Faculty of Science, Information Technology and Education, Northern Territory University, Darwin NT 0909, Australia Corresponding author. Current address: Department of Geography, University of Toronto, 100 St. Georges Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. E-mail: chenx@geog.utoronto.ca
Derek Eamus
Affiliation:
Cooperative Research Centre for the Sustainable Development of Tropical Savannas, Faculty of Science, Information Technology and Education, Northern Territory University, Darwin NT 0909, Australia Corresponding author. Current address: Department of Geography, University of Toronto, 100 St. Georges Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. E-mail: chenx@geog.utoronto.ca
Lindsay B. Hutley
Affiliation:
Cooperative Research Centre for the Sustainable Development of Tropical Savannas, Faculty of Science, Information Technology and Education, Northern Territory University, Darwin NT 0909, Australia

Abstract

Fine roots and their turnover represent a dynamic aspect of below-ground biomass (BGB) and nutrient capital in forest ecosystems, and account for a significant fraction of net primary productivity (NPP) (Cuevas 1995, Vogt et al. 1990). On a weight basis, coarse roots contribute more to total ecosystem biomass than fine roots, but they account for only a small portion of annual root production (Eamus et al. 2002). Despite the fact that fine roots may compose less than 2% of total ecosystem biomass, they may contribute up to 40% of total ecosystem production (Vogt et al. 1990). Therefore, estimates of root production, like estimates of root biomass, should differentiate between coarse- and fine-root production.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
2004 Cambridge University Press

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