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Roosting site selection by Artibeus watsoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) on Anthurium ravenii (Araceae) in Costa Rica

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

Jae C. Choe
Affiliation:
The Biological Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
Robert M. Timm
Affiliation:
Division of Mammals, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois 60605, USA

Abstract

Artibeus watsoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) was found in Costa Rica to alter the shape of 11 species of broad-leafed plants in the families Araceae, Cyclanthaceae, Maran-taceae, Musaceae, and Palmae to form diurnal roost sites. The plant most commonly used for tent construction was Anthurium ravenii (Araceae). Bats create a tent on A. ravenii by severing the basal 2 to 5 lateral nerves at a distance of 5 to 10 mm from the midrib; the entire margin of the leaf then collapses downward to form a pyramid-shaped tent. The number of altered leaves per plant ranges from 1 to 4 with a mean of 2.1. A. watsoni appears to be selecting leaves of medium size and low within the plant. The size, shape, and location of leaves selected is consistent with the hypothesis that tent construction provides bats with roost sites that will be available to them for a long period of time and provides protection from both predators and the elements, thus conveying a selective advantage to the bats.

Resumen

Artibeus watsoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) fue encontrado en Costa Rica alterando la forma de 11 especies de plantas de hojas anchas en las familias Araceae, Cyclanthaceae, Marantaceae, Musaceae, y Palmae para formar sitios de perchas diumas. La planta más comúmente usada para construcción fue Anthurium ravenii (Araceae). Murciélagos crean una carpa en A. ravenii cortando las 2 o 5 nervaduras laterales basales a una distancia de 5 a 10 mm de la nervadura central; entonces todo el margen de la hoja colapsa hacia abajo para formar una carpa en forma de pirámide. El número de hojas alteradas por planta varió de 1 a 4 con un promedio de 2,1. A. watsoni parece estar seleccionando hojas de talla mediana y de posición inferior en la planta. El tamaño, forma y posición de las hojas seleccionadas es consistente con la hipótesis de que construcción de carpas provee a los murciélagos con sitios de perchas que serán disponibles para ellos por un largo peníodo de tiempo y provee protección de predadores y elementos, dando así una ventaja selectiva a los murciélagos.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

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References

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Roosting site selection by Artibeus watsoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) on Anthurium ravenii (Araceae) in Costa Rica
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Roosting site selection by Artibeus watsoni (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) on Anthurium ravenii (Araceae) in Costa Rica
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