Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.285 Render date: 2022-08-13T03:50:53.817Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Indeterminism Versus Determinism: The Seventh Prapāṭhaka of the Chāndogya Upaniṣad

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Extract

Much has been written and said about determinism in Indian philosophy and religion, but not enough heed seems to have been paid to many statements and theories advanced by the Indian literati in their attempt to offset the enthralment of man by the automaticism involved in such deterministic doctrines as those of karman and the ensuing saṁsāra.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal Asiatic Society 1976

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 The story is so well familiar and popular that it has been published in India as a book for the use of primary-school children. It is the third and fourth fable of Book IV (Sandhi) of the Hitopadeśa.

2 Prastāvanā, 31–3.

3 Ed. Francis Johnson, London, 1884 (2nd ed.).

4 Somatism: A basic concept in India's philosophical speculations”, Philosophy East and West, Univ. of Hawaii, XVIII, 4, 10 1968, 271.Google Scholar

5 Sénart's interpretation of karoti in the context under (f) and (g) as “on sacrifie” seems to miss the point. Karoti here means “one acts in the light of what has been previously cognized and resolved upon”. Cf. the discussion of the concept of karma in ChU later on.

6 It is one of those cases where the twain of grammar and metaphysics affords such an elegant rendezvous.

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Indeterminism Versus Determinism: The Seventh Prapāṭhaka of the Chāndogya Upaniṣad
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Indeterminism Versus Determinism: The Seventh Prapāṭhaka of the Chāndogya Upaniṣad
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Indeterminism Versus Determinism: The Seventh Prapāṭhaka of the Chāndogya Upaniṣad
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *