Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-5rlvm Total loading time: 0.235 Render date: 2021-10-20T01:08:34.653Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Seasonal shift in community pattern of planktonic diatoms and environmental drivers in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2015

Hongli Qi
Affiliation:
Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China College of Fisheries Science, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin 300384, China
Yuping Xu
Affiliation:
Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China
Xiaozhong Hu
Affiliation:
Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China
Honggang Ma
Affiliation:
Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China
Henglong Xu*
Affiliation:
Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China
*
Correspondence should be addressed to:H. Xu, Institute of Evolution and Marine Biodiversity, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China email: henglongxu@126.com

Abstract

Diatoms are a primary producer and play an important role in the functioning of microbial food webs. Temporal variations in community patterns of planktonic diatom assemblages were studied during a 1-year cycle (June 2007–May 2008) in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China. Samples were collected biweekly at a depth of 1 m from five sampling stations. A total of 75 diatom species representing 40 genera, 28 family, 19 orders and three classes were recorded. Of these species, 11 distributed in all four seasons, while 27, 35, 56 and 28 forms occurred only in spring, summer, autumn and winter season, respectively. The species number and total abundance peaked in autumn, with minimum values in May. All three species biodiversity measures (Shannon diversity, Pielou's evenness and Marglef's richness) peaked in spring and autumn. There was a significant difference in diatom community patterns among seasons, except the pair of spring and winter. The environmental variables, especially temperature and the nutrients, could significantly drive the seasonal variation in diatom community patterns. Of 11 dominant species, four (Paralia sulcata, Skeletonema costatum, Guinardia delicatula and Nitzschia lorenziana) were significantly related with temperature, pH and/or nutrients. These findings suggest that the seasonal shift in community pattern of planktonic diatoms was driven by both temperature and nutrients in this eutrophic basin ecosystem.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, M.J., Gorley, R.N. and Clarke, K.R. (2008) PERMANOVA+ for PRIMER guide to software and statistical methods. Plymouth: PRIMER-E.Google Scholar
APHA (1992) Standard methods for examination of water and waste water. 18th edition. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association.Google Scholar
Berger, W.H. and Wefer, G. (1991) Productivity of the glacial ocean: discussion of the iron hypothesis. Limnology and Oceanography 36, 18991918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berthon, V., Bouchez, A. and Rimet, F. (2011) Using diatom life-forms and ecological guilds to assess organic pollution and trophic level in rivers: a case study of rivers in south-eastern France. Hydrobiologica 673, 259271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., Qin, Y., Stevenson, M.A. and McGowan, S. (2014) Diatom communities along pH and hydrological gradients in three montane mires, central China. Ecological Indicators 45, 123129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, K.R. and Gorley, R.N. (2006) PRIMER 6 user manual/tutorial. Plymouth: PRIMER-E.Google Scholar
Di, B., Liu, D., Wang, Y., Dong, Z., Li, X. and Shi, Y. (2013) Diatom and silicoflagellate in modern surface sediments associated with human activities: a case study in Sishili Bay, China. Ecological Indicators 24, 2330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duong, T.T., Coste, M., Feurtet-Mazel, A., Dang, D.K., Gold, C., Park, Y.S. and Boudou, A. (2006) Impact of urban pollution from the Hanoi area on benthic diatom communities collected from the red, Nhu and Tolich rivers (Vietnam). Hydrobiologia 563, 201216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkelstein, S.A. and Davis, A.M. (2006) Paleoenvironmental records of water level and climatic changes from the middle to late Holocene at a Lake Erie coastal wetland, Ontario, Canada. Quaternary Research 65, 3343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hasle, G.R. and Syvertsen, E.E. (1997) Marine diatoms. In Tomas, C.R. (ed.) Identifying marine phytoplankton. San Diego, CA: Academic Press, pp. 5385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jiang, Y., Xu, H., Hu, X., Zhu, M., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S. and Warren, A. (2011) An approach to analyzing spatial patterns of planktionc ciliate communities for monitoring water quality in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China. Marine Pollution Bulletin 62, 227235.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jiang, Y., Xu, H. and Warren, A. (2014) Insights into discriminating environmental quality status using taxonomic distinctness based on a small species pool of ciliated protozoa in marine ecosystems. Science of the Total Environment 468–469, 663670.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jiang, Y., Zhu, M., Zhang, W., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S. and Xu, H. (2013) Influence of sample sizes on analyzing community parameters of periphytic diatoms for bioassessment using an artificial substrate in coastal waters. Water Environmental Research 85, 22282234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, D., Sun, J., Chen, H. and Zhang, L. (2003a) The phytoplankton community in summer 2001 in Jiaozhou Bay, China. Journal of Ocean University of Qingdao 33, 366374. [in Chinese, with English abstract]Google Scholar
Liu, D., Sun, J., Zhang, J. and Liu, G. (2008) Response of the diatom flora in Jiaozhou Bay, China to environmental changes during the last century. Marine Micropaleontology 66, 279290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, D., Sun, J. and Zhang, L. (2003b) Structural characteristics of phytoplankton community during harmful alage bloom in Jiaozhou Bay. Chinese Journal of Applied Ecology 14, 19631966. [in Chinese, with English abstract]Google Scholar
Liu, S., Zhang, J., Chen, H. and Zhang, G. (2005) Factors influencing nutrient dynamics in the eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay, North China. Progress in Oceanography 66, 6685.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, Y., Zhang, W. and Xu, H. (2013) Influence of enumeration time periods on detecting community parameters of periphytic diatoms using an artificial substratum in coastal waters. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 93, 20672073.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, Y., Zhang, W. and Xu, H. (2014) Colonization dynamics of periphytic diatoms in coastal waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China. Acta Oceanologica Sinica 33, 160165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, Z., Wei, H., Liu, G. and Zhang, J. (2004) Simulation of water exchange in Jiaozhou Bay by average residence time approach. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science 61, 2535.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nuccio, C., Melillo, C., Massi, L. and Innamorati, M. (2003) Phytoplankton abundance, community structure and diversity in the eutrophicated Orbetello lagoon (Tuscany) from 1995 to 2001. Oceanologica Acta 26, 1525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Round, F.E., Crawford, R.M. and Mann, D.G. (1990) The diatoms. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Shen, Z. (2001) Historical changes in nutrient structure and its influences on phytoplankton composition in Jiaozhou Bay. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science 52, 211224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smucker, N.J. and Vis, M.L. (2011a) Diatom biomonitoring of streams: reliability of reference sites and the response of metrics to environmental variations across temporal scales. Ecological Indicators 11, 16471657.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smucker, N.J. and Vis, M.L. (2011b) Spatial factors contribute to benthic diatom structure in stream across spatial scales: considerations for biomonitoring. Ecological Indicators 11, 11911203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stenger-Kovács, C., Lengyel, E., Crossetti, L.O., Üveges, V. and Padisák, J. (2013) Diatom ecological guilds as indicators of temporally changing stressors and disturbances in the small Torna-stream, Hungary. Ecological Indicators 24, 138147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Utermöhl, H. (1958) Zurvervolkommungder quantitativen phytoplankton Methodik. Mitteilungen der Internationale Vereinigung für Theoretische und Angewandte. Limnologie 9, 138.Google Scholar
Wan Mazanh, W.O. and Mansor, M. (2002). Aquatic pollution assessment based on attached diatom communities in the Pinang river Basin, Malaysia. Hydrobiologia 478, 229241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Xu, H., Jiang, Y., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S., Al-Farraj, S.A. and Song, W. (2011) Application of an indicator based on taxonomic relatedness of ciliated protozoan assemblages for marine environmental assessment. Environmental Science and Pollution Research 18, 12131221.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Xu, H., Song, W., Warren, A., Al-Rasheid, K.A.S., Al-Farraj, S.A., Gong, J. and Hu, X. (2008) Planktonic protist communities in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond: structural variation and correlation with environmental conditions. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 88, 13531362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zielinski, U. and Gersonde, R. (1997) Diatom distribution in Southern Ocean surface sediments (Atlantic sector): implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions, Palaeogeogr aphy, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 129, 213250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Qi supplementary material

Table S1

Download Qi supplementary material(File)
File 173 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Seasonal shift in community pattern of planktonic diatoms and environmental drivers in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Seasonal shift in community pattern of planktonic diatoms and environmental drivers in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Seasonal shift in community pattern of planktonic diatoms and environmental drivers in Jiaozhou Bay, northern China
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *