Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.315 Render date: 2022-08-18T08:14:29.663Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The dinoflagellae bloom on the coast of south west England, August-September 1978

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

G. T. Boalch
Affiliation:
The Laboratory, Marine Biological Association, Citadel Hill, Plymouth

Extract

Towards the end of August 1978 SCUBA divers studying a rocky area in Mounts Bay noticed numbers of dead and dying fish and invertebrates in their study area. Their observations were passed on to Dr G. W. Potts (Griffiths, Dennis & Potts, see below, p. 520). Samples of the sea water, which appeared to be very rich in phytoplankton, were taken but unfortunately were too poorly fixed for the identification of naked dinoflagellates. At the same time a number of reports of‘red tides’ and ‘fish kills’ in Mounts Bay were being passed to Mrs Stella Turk of Camborne.

During the first 2 weeks of September 1978, high mortalities of intertidal populations of several ‘bait’ species, notably lugworms, were reported to the Plymouth Laboratory by anglers along the south coast of Cornwall. In the same period, abnormally high numbers of the red-band fish, Cepola rubescens, were caught in the trawls of the Laboratory's research vessels (Dr A. J. Southward, personal communication). In addition, some 20–30 specimens of another burrowing species, Amalosoma eddystonense, were taken in several trawls on the Looe Grounds; this was rather surprising since this large echiuran was thought to be rare in the Plymouth area (Dr P. E. Gibbs, personal communication).

The author also received reports indicating that the non-photosynthetic but luminescent dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans (Macartney) Ehrenb. was abundant in coastal areas of the western English Channel. This organism is well known for forming slicks varying in colour from orange to blood-red (Le Févre & Grail, 1970; Grail, Le FévreLehoerff & Le Févre, 1971).

Type
Short Notes
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1979

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

* Figures and references for these five related papers have been combined; for references see p. 527.

30
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The dinoflagellae bloom on the coast of south west England, August-September 1978
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The dinoflagellae bloom on the coast of south west England, August-September 1978
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The dinoflagellae bloom on the coast of south west England, August-September 1978
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *