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Differences in the cnidomes and toxicities of the oral arms of two commercially harvested rhizostome jellyfish species in Thailand

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2020

Yusuke Kondo
Affiliation:
Takehara Station, Setouchi Field Science Center, Graduate School of Integrated Science for Life, Hiroshima University, 5-8-1 Minato-machi, Takehara, Hiroshima, 725-0024, Japan
Yasuko Suzuki
Affiliation:
Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 4-5-7 Konan, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8477, Japan
Susumu Ohtsuka
Affiliation:
Takehara Station, Setouchi Field Science Center, Graduate School of Integrated Science for Life, Hiroshima University, 5-8-1 Minato-machi, Takehara, Hiroshima, 725-0024, Japan
Hiroshi Nagai
Affiliation:
Department of Ocean Sciences, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 4-5-7 Konan, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8477, Japan
Hayato Tanaka
Affiliation:
Tokyo Sea Life Park, 6-2-3 Rinkai-cho, Edogawa-ku, Tokyo, 134-0086, Japan
Khwanruan Srinui
Affiliation:
Institute of Marine Science, Burapha University, Muang, Chon Buri, 20131, Thailand
Hiroshi Miyake
Affiliation:
School of Marine Bioscience, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0373, Japan
Jun Nishikawa
Affiliation:
School of Marine Science and Technology, Tokai University, 3-20-1, Orido, Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka, 424-8610, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In Thailand, two species of rhizostome jellyfish, Rhopilema hispidum and Lobonemoides robustus, are commercially harvested. The cnidomes, nematocyst size and toxicities were compared between these species. Rhopilema hispidum and L. robustus each had four types of nematocysts on their oral arms. For R. hispidum, these nematocyst types included two types of isorhiza and two types of rhopaloid, while in L. robustus, there were three types of isorhiza and one type of rhopaloid. For R. hispidum, tubule lengths of the largest nematocyst type (large round isorhiza; mean ± SD = 313.8 ± 62.2 μm) were significantly longer than those of L. robustus (large ellipsoid rhopaloid; 162.1 ± 38.5 μm). Using the freshwater shrimp, Palaemon paucidens, in a bioassay, we determined that the lethal nematocyst concentrations for R. hispidum and L. robustus were 5705.3 ± 1118.1 and 3408.3 ± 1032.9 unit g−1 wet weight, respectively, and that these concentrations were significantly higher in the former than in the latter.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2020

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Differences in the cnidomes and toxicities of the oral arms of two commercially harvested rhizostome jellyfish species in Thailand
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