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Carotenoid pigments in sabella penicillus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

Welton L. Lee
Affiliation:
Bedford College, University of London
Barbara M. Gilchrist
Affiliation:
Bedford College, University of London
R. Phillips Dales
Affiliation:
Bedford College, University of London

Extract

The pigments of the polychaete Sabella penicillus L. were reinvestigated. In addition to zeaxanthin and traces of lutein, a series of carotenoids which may represent steps in the formation of canthaxanthin have been found. These are β-carotene, isocryptoxanthin, echinenone, 4-hydroxy-4′-keto β-carotene and canthaxanthin. No astaxanthin was found. In two other sabellids, Myxicola infundibulum (Renier) and Megalomma vesiculosum (Montagu), astaxanthin was confirmed as the major pigment and the presence of echinenone was established. Attention was drawn to the similarity of the pigments of Sabella penicillus with those of other invertebrates and it has been suggested that in invertebrates a common pathway for the formation of canthaxanthin may exist.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1967

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References

Dales, R. P., 1962. The nature of the pigments in the crowns of sabellid and serpulid polychaetes. J. mar. biol. Ass. U.K., Vol. 42, pp. 259–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fox, D. L. & Hopkins, T. S., 1966. Comparative metabolicfractionation of carotenoids in three flamingo species. Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Vol. 17, pp. 841–56.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Karrer, P. & Leumann, E., 1951. Eschscholtzxanthinand anhydro-eschschcltzxanthin. Helv. chim. Acta, Vol. 34, pp. 445–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krinsky, N. I. & Goldsmith, T. H., 1960. The carotenoids of the flagellated alga, Euglena gracilis. Archs Biochem. Biophys., Vol. 91, pp. 271–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, W. L., 1966 a. Pigmentation of the marine isopod Idothea montereyensis. Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Vol. 18, pp. 1736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, W. L., 1966 b. Pigmentation of the marine isopod Idothea granulosa (Rathke). Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Vol. 19, pp. 1327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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