Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-jwnkl Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T08:13:34.505Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

What is it about bilingualism that affects Boston Naming Test performance? A reply to commentaries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2007

TAMAR H. GOLLAN
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California Veterans Medical Research Foundation, San Diego, California Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California
CHRISTINE FENNEMA-NOTESTINE
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California Veterans Medical Research Foundation, San Diego, California

Abstract

We reported that bilingualism affects BNT performance, and that people who are “more bilingual” show larger “bilingual effects” on naming. The commentators suggested the interesting possibilities that degree of bilingualism may not be as critical as immersion in two different language environments over the course of a lifetime (Bialystok & Craik, this issue), and that proficiency in Spanish (or lack thereof in English-dominant speakers; Acevedo & Lowenstein, this issue) may be more powerful predictors of the effects we reported. In our response, we use the literature on bilingualism, and additional exploratory analyses of the data we published in this issue to predict that our findings will generalize (a) to bilinguals who speak languages other than Spanish and English, and perhaps even to (b) English-dominant bilinguals who were educated in an English speaking environment. (JINS, 2007, 13, 215–218.)

Type
COMMENTARIES
Copyright
© 2007 The International Neuropsychological Society

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Acevedo, A. & Lowenstein, D.A. (2007, this issue). Performance on the Boston Naming Test in English-Spanish bilingual older adults: Some considerations. The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13. 212214.Google Scholar
Allegri, R.F., Mangone, C.A., Fernandez Villavicencio, A., Rymberg, S., Taragano, F.E., & Baumann, D. (1997). Spanish Boston Naming Test norms. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 11, 416420.Google Scholar
Bialystok, E. & Craik, F.I.M. (2007, this issue). Bilingualism and naming: Implications for cognitive assessment. The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13, 209211.Google Scholar
Costa, A., Caramazza, A., & Sebastian-Galles, N. (2000). The cognate facilitation effect: Implications for models of lexical access. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 26, 12831296.Google Scholar
Costa, A., Santesteban, M., & Caño, A. (2005). On the facilitatory effects of cognate words in bilingual speech production. Brain & Language, 94, 94103.Google Scholar
De Groot, A.M.B., Borgwaldt, S., Bos, M., & van den Eijnden, E. (2002). Lexical decision and word naming in bilinguals: Language effects and task effects. Journal of Memory and Language, 47, 91124.Google Scholar
Gollan, T.H. & Acenas, L.A. (2004). What is a TOT? Cognate and Translation Effects on Tip-of-the-Tongue States in Spanish-English and Tagalog-English Bilinguals. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 30, 246269.Google Scholar
Gollan, T.H., Fennema-Notestine, C., Montoya, R.I., & Jernigan, T.L. (2007, this issue). The Bilingual Effect on Boston Naming Test performance. The Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13, 197208.Google Scholar
Gollan, T.H., Forster, K.I., & Frost, R. (1997). Translation priming with different scripts: Masked priming with cognates and noncognates in Hebrew-English bilinguals. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 23, 11221139.Google Scholar
Gollan, T.H. & Silverberg, N.B. (2001). Tip-of-the-tongue states in Hebrew-English bilinguals. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 4, 6384.Google Scholar
Kohnert, K. (2004). Cognitive and cognate-based treatments for bilingual aphasia: A case study. Brain and Language, 91, 294302.Google Scholar
Roberts, P.M. & Deslauriers, L. (1999). Picture naming of cognate and non-cognate nouns in bilingual aphasia. Journal of Communication Disorders, 32, 123.Google Scholar
Roberts, P.M., Garcia, L.J., Desrochers, A., & Hernandez, D. (2002). English performance of proficient bilingual adults on the Boston Naming Test. Aphasiology, 16, 635645.Google Scholar
Van Hell, J.G. & Dijkstra, T. (2002). Foreign language knowledge can influence native language performance in exclusively native contexts. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9, 780789.Google Scholar