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Reading Fluency Estimates of Current Intellectual Function: Demographic Factors and Effects of Type of Stimuli

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 January 2013

Panagiotis G. Simos*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
Georgios D. Sideridis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
Dimitrios Kasselimis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
Angeliki Mouzaki
Affiliation:
Department of Elementary Education, University of Crete, Greece
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Panagiotis G. Simos, Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Rethymno, 74100 Greece. E-mail: akis.simos@gmail.com

Abstract

The study explores the potential clinical value of reading fluency measures in complementing demographic variables as indices of current intellectual capacity. IQ estimates (based on the PPVT-R, WASI Vocabulary and Block Design subtests) were obtained from a representative, non-clinical sample of 386 Greek adults aged 48–87 years along with two measures of reading efficiency (one involving relatively high-frequency words—WRE—and the second comprised of phonotactically matched pseudowords—PsWRE). Both reading measures (number of items read correctly in 45 s) accounted for significant portions of variability in demographically adjusted verbal and performance IQ indices. Reading measures provided IQ estimates which were significantly closer to those predicted by demographic variables alone in up to 22% of individuals with fewer than 7 (across all ages) or 13 years of formal education (in the 70–87 year age range). PsWRE scores slightly outperformed WRE scores in predicting a person's estimated verbal or performance IQ. Results are discussed in the context of previous findings using reading accuracy measures for low-frequency words with exceptional spellings in less transparent orthographic systems such as English. (JINS, 2013, 19, 1–7)

Type
Brief Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2013

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