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Preliminary evidence of motor impairment among polysubstance 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine users with intact neuropsychological functioning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2010

CHAD A. BOUSMAN
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California
MARIANA CHERNER
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California
KRISTEN T. EMORY
Affiliation:
San Diego State University/ University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Public Health, San Diego, California
DANIEL BARRON
Affiliation:
HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California
PATRICIA GREBENSTEIN
Affiliation:
HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California
J. HAMPTON ATKINSON
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California VA San Diego Healthcare System, La Jolla, California
ROBERT K. HEATON
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California
IGOR GRANT
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, San Diego, California VA San Diego Healthcare System, La Jolla, California
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Neuropsychological disturbances have been reported in association with use of the recreational drug “ecstasy,” or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but findings have been inconsistent. We performed comprehensive neuropsychological testing examining seven ability domains in 21 MDMA users (MDMA+) and 21 matched control participants (MDMA−). Among MDMA+ participants, median [interquartile range] lifetime MDMA use was 186 [111, 516] doses, with 120 [35–365] days of abstinence. There were no significant group differences in neuropsychological performance, with the exception of the motor speed/dexterity domain in which 43% of MDMA+ were impaired compared with 5% of MDMA− participants (p = .004). Motor impairment differences were not explained by use of other substances and were unrelated to length of abstinence or lifetime number of MDMA doses. Findings provide limited evidence for neuropsychological differences between MDMA+ and MDMA− participants with the exception of motor impairments observed in the MDMA+ group. However, replication of this finding in a larger sample is warranted. (JINS, 2010, 16, 1047–1055.)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2010

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Preliminary evidence of motor impairment among polysubstance 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine users with intact neuropsychological functioning
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