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A pilot study of use-dependent learning in the context of Constraint Induced Language Therapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 October 2006

LYNN M. MAHER
Affiliation:
Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Rehabilitation Research, Houston, Texas Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall Department of Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
DIANE KENDALL
Affiliation:
Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall Department of Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida
JENNIFER A. SWEARENGIN
Affiliation:
Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Rehabilitation Research, Houston, Texas
AMY RODRIGUEZ
Affiliation:
Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall Department of Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida
SUSAN A. LEON
Affiliation:
Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall Department of Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida
KARYN PINGEL
Affiliation:
James A. Haley VA Medical Center, Tampa, Florida
AUDREY HOLLAND
Affiliation:
Speech and Hearing Sciences Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
LESLIE J. GONZALEZ ROTHI
Affiliation:
Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall Department of Veterans Affairs VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida

Abstract

This investigation reports the results of a pilot study concerning the application of principles of use-dependent learning developed in the motor rehabilitation literature as Constraint Induced Therapy to language rehabilitation in a group of individuals with chronic aphasia. We compared treatment that required forced use of the language modality, Constraint Induced Language Therapy, (CILT) to treatment allowing all modes of communication. Both treatments were administrated intensively in a massed practice paradigm, using the same therapeutic stimuli and tasks. Results suggest that whereas both interventions yielded positive outcomes, CILT participants showed more consistent improvement on standard aphasia measures and clinician judgments of narrative discourse. These findings suggest that CILT intervention may be a viable approach to aphasia rehabilitation. (JINS, 2006, 12, 843–852.)

Type
SYMPOSIUM
Copyright
© 2006 The International Neuropsychological Society

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