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A Neuropsychological Profile for Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum? Cognitive, Academic, Executive, Social, and Behavioral Functioning in School-Age Children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2018

Vanessa Siffredi
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Behavioral Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, University of Geneva, Switzerland School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Vicki Anderson
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Behavioral Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, University of Geneva, Switzerland School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Department of Psychology, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
Alissandra McIlroy
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Behavioral Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Amanda G. Wood
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Behavioral Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, University of Geneva, Switzerland School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, United-Kingdom
Richard J. Leventer
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Department of Neurology, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Neuroscience Research Group, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
Megan M. Spencer-Smith*
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Behavioral Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, University of Geneva, Switzerland School of Psychological Sciences and Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Megan Spencer-Smith, School of Psychological Sciences and Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton Campus, Clayton VIC 3800, Australia. E-mail: megan.spencer-smith@monash.edu

Abstract

Objectives: Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC), characterized by developmental absence of the corpus callosum, is one of the most common congenital brain malformations. To date, there are limited data on the neuropsychological consequences of AgCC and factors that modulate different outcomes, especially in children. This study aimed to describe general intellectual, academic, executive, social and behavioral functioning in a cohort of school-aged children presenting for clinical services to a hospital and diagnosed with AgCC. The influences of age, social risk and neurological factors were examined. Methods: Twenty-eight school-aged children (8 to 17 years) diagnosed with AgCC completed tests of general intelligence (IQ) and academic functioning. Executive, social and behavioral functioning in daily life, and social risk, were estimated from parent and teacher rated questionnaires. MRI findings reviewed by a pediatric neurologist confirmed diagnosis and identified brain characteristics. Clinical details including the presence of epilepsy and diagnosed genetic condition were obtained from medical records. Results: In our cohort, ~50% of children experienced general intellectual, academic, executive, social and/or behavioral difficulties and ~20% were functioning at a level comparable to typically developing children. Social risk was important for understanding variability in neuropsychological outcomes. Brain anomalies and complete AgCC were associated with lower mathematics performance and poorer executive functioning. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of general intellectual, academic, executive social and behavioral consequences of AgCC in school-aged children. The findings have important clinical implications, suggesting that support to families and targeted intervention could promote positive neuropsychological functioning in children with AgCC who come to clinical attention. (JINS, 2018, 24, 445–455)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2018 

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