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IQ and the Fronto-temporal Cortex in Bipolar Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2012

Leticia Gutiérrez-Galve*
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom Hospital Clínico Universitario and Universidad de Zaragoza. Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM). Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Pabellón de Gobierno, Madrid, Spain
Stefania Bruno
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
Claudia A.M. Wheeler-Kingshott
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
Mary Summers
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
Lisa Cipolotti
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
Maria A. Ron
Affiliation:
UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom
*Corresponding
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Leticia Gutierrez-Galve, Box 112 National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. E-mail: l.gutierrez@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Cognitive changes are documented in bipolar disorder (BP). Cortical volume loss, especially in prefrontal regions, has also been reported, but associations between cognition and cortical abnormalities have not been fully documented. This study explores associations between cognitive performance and cortical parameters (area, thickness and volume) of the fronto-temporal cortex in 36 BP patients (25 BPI and 11 BPII). T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla scanner. Cortical parameters were measured using surface-based morphometry and their associations with estimated premorbid, current IQ, visual memory, and executive function explored. Premorbid IQ was associated with frontal cortical area and volume, but no such associations were present for current cognitive performance. Cortical parameters were not different in BPI and BPII patients, but the association between current IQ and temporal cortical area was stronger in BPII patients. The pattern of cortico-cognitive associations in BPI and BPII patients merits further consideration. (JINS, 2012, 18, 370–374)

Type
Brief Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2012

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