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Investigation of response inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder using the Hayling task

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2005

MARTIAL VAN DER LINDEN
Affiliation:
Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, FPSE, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
GRAZIA CESCHI
Affiliation:
Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, FPSE, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
ARIANE ZERMATTEN
Affiliation:
Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, FPSE, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
DANIELA DUNKER
Affiliation:
Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, FPSE, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
ALAIN PERROUD
Affiliation:
Clinique des Vallées, Ville-la-Grand, France

Abstract

This study investigates response inhibition deficits in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) by using the Hayling task. Sixteen OCD washers, 16 OCD checkers, 16 social phobic patients and 16 nonanxious controls were asked to complete sentences with either the expected word (section A: “initiation”) or an unrelated word (section B: “inhibition”). The groups did not differ in terms of section B minus section A latencies. However, OCD washers and checkers made significantly more errors (sentence-related responses) in section B than social phobic patients and controls. In the OCD patients, the frequency of these errors correlates with the total OCD severity score and the compulsion subscore, but not with the depression and anxiety scores. These findings suggest that OCD patients might present a specific deficit affecting the inhibition of a prepotent response. (JINS, 2005, 11, 776–783.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 The International Neuropsychological Society

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