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The influence of illusory motion on line bisection performance in normal subjects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2005

KYUNG MOOK CHOI
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
BON D. KU
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Gyeonggi, Korea
YONG JEONG
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Florida and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida, USA
BYUNG HWA LEE
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
HYUN-JUNG AHN
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
SUE J. KANG
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
JUHEE CHIN
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
KENNETH M. HEILMAN
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Florida and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida, USA
DUK L. NA
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Abstract

The present study examines whether illusory movement (IM) of a horizontal line, induced by a moving background (MB), influences line-bisection performance in normal subjects. The first experiment attempted to identify the speeds of MB that induce IM. We found that when speed is increased from 1.53° to 13.3°/sec, IM increases, but that with further speed increases, IM decreases. Leftward MB induces rightward IM, and vice versa. In the second experiment, we had subjects bisect lines at MB speeds that had been shown to induce IM in the first experiment. We found that leftward MB induced a rightward bias, and vice versa. We also found that there was a relationship between the magnitude of IM and the degree of bias. In the third experiment, by making the target line larger than the MB, we made the conditions where IM was presumably absent. Unlike the results of bisection performed with IM, subjects showed a bias in the direction of the MB. Overall, these experiments demonstrated that the perception of motion induces subjects to attend in the direction of movement. (JINS, 2005, 11, 881–888.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 The International Neuropsychological Society

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