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Hippocampal volume and retention in Alzheimer's disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2004

JOEL H. KRAMER
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at San Francisco
NORBERT SCHUFF
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco
BRUCE R. REED
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at Davis
DAN MUNGAS
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at Davis
AN-TAO DU
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco
HOWARD J. ROSEN
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at San Francisco
WILLIAM J. JAGUST
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at Davis
BRUCE L. MILLER
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of California at San Francisco
MICHAEL W. WEINER
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University of California at San Francisco
HELENA C. CHUI
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Southern California at Downey

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that the hippocampus has a relatively specific role in retaining information over delays. Thirty-seven subjects with probable Alzheimer's disease were evaluated with a verbal memory task and structural MRI. Cortical gray matter but not hippocampal volume predicted immediate free recall. In contrast, hippocampal volume was the best predictor of how well information was retained over a delay, even after controlling for levels of immediate recall. Results suggest that the role of the hippocampus is relatively specific to the consolidation of new memories. (JINS, 2004, 10, 639–643.)

Type
BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Copyright
2004 The International Neuropsychological Society

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