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Evaluative processing of ambivalent stimuli in patients with schizophrenia and depression: A [15O] H2O PET study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2009

JAE-JIN KIM
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gwangju Gyeonggi, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
HAE-JEONG PARK
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gwangju Gyeonggi, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
YOUNG-CHUL JUNG*
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gwangju Gyeonggi, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
JI WON CHUN
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gwangju Gyeonggi, Korea
HYE SUN KIM
Affiliation:
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gwangju Gyeonggi, Korea
JEONG HO SEOK
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hallym University College of Medicine, Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea
NAM WOOK KIM
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
IL HO PARK
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Myong-Ji Hospital, Koyang, Korea
MAENG-GUN OH
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
JONG DOO LEE
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
*
*Correspondence and reprint requests to: Young-Chul Jung, Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Mental Health Hospital, 696-6 Tanbul-dong, Gwangju-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 464-100. E-mail: eugenejung@yuhs.ac

Abstract

Decision making in an emotionally conflicting situation is important in social life. We aimed to address the similarity and disparity of neural correlates involved in processing ambivalent stimuli in patients with schizophrenia and patients with depression. Behavioral task-related hemodynamic responses were measured using [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in 12 patients with schizophrenia and 12 patients with depression. The task was a modified word-stem completion task, which was designed to evoke ambivalence in forced and non-forced choice conditions. The prefrontal cortex and the cerebellum were found to show increased activity in the healthy control group. In the schizophrenia group, activity in these two regions was negligible. In the depression group, the pattern of activity was altered and a functional compensatory recruitment of the inferior parietal regions was suggested. The prefrontal cortex seems to be associated with the cognitive control to resolve the conflict toward the ambivalent stimuli, whereas the cerebellum reflects the sustained working memory to search for compromise alternatives. The deficit of cerebellar activation in the schizophrenia group might underlie the inability to search and consider compromising responses for conflict resolution. (JINS, 2009, 15, 990–1001.)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2009

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