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Differential Resting State Connectivity Patterns and Impaired Semantically Cued List Learning Test Performance in Early Course Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2016

Julia A. Rao
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois
Lisanne M. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois
Erica Hymen
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois
Maia Feigon
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois
Sara L. Weisenbach
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois University of Michigan Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Ann Arbor, Michigan Jesse Brown Veterans Administration Hospital, Research & Development Program, Chicago, Illinois
Jon-Kar Zubieta
Affiliation:
University of Michigan Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Scott A. Langenecker*
Affiliation:
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Chicago, Illinois University of Michigan Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Ann Arbor, Michigan
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Scott A. Langenecker, University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, 1601 W. Taylor Street, m/c 912, Chicago, IL 60612. E-mail: slangenecker@psych.uic.edu.

Abstract

Objectives: There is a well-known association between memory impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD). Additionally, recent studies are also showing resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsMRI) abnormalities in active and remitted MDD. However, no studies to date have examined both rs connectivity and memory performance in early course remitted MDD, nor the relationship between connectivity and semantically cued episodic memory. Methods: The rsMRI data from two 3.0 Tesla GE scanners were collected from 34 unmedicated young adults with remitted MDD (rMDD) and 23 healthy controls (HCs) between 18 and 23 years of age using bilateral seeds in the hippocampus. Participants also completed a semantically cued list-learning test, and their performance was correlated with hippocampal seed-based rsMRI. Regression models were also used to predict connectivity patterns from memory performance. Results: After correcting for sex, rMDD subjects performed worse than HCs on the total number of words recalled and recognized. rMDD demonstrated significant in-network hypoactivation between the hippocampus and multiple fronto-temporal regions, and multiple extra-network hyperconnectivities between the hippocampus and fronto-parietal regions when compared to HCs. Memory performance negatively predicted connectivity in HCs and positively predicted connectivity in rMDD. Conclusions Even when individuals with a history of MDD are no longer displaying active depressive symptoms, they continue to demonstrate worse memory performance, disruptions in hippocampal connectivity, and a differential relationship between episodic memory and hippocampal connectivity. (JINS, 2016, 22, 225–239)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2016 

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