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Combined Processing of Facial and Vocal Emotion in Remitted Patients With Bipolar I Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 February 2019

Christine M. Hoertnagl*
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Falko Biedermann
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Nursen Yalcin-Siedentopf
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Anna-Sophia Welte
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Beatrice Frajo-Apor
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Eberhard A. Deisenhammer
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Armand Hausmann
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Georg Kemmler
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
Moritz Muehlbacher
Affiliation:
Private Medical University Salzburg, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Salzburg, Austria
Alex Hofer
Affiliation:
Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Innsbruck, Austria
*Corresponding
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Christine Hoertnagl, Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Division of Psychiatry I, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria. E-mail: christine.hoertnagl@i-med.ac.at

Abstract

Objectives: Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with impairments in facial emotion and emotional prosody perception during both mood episodes and periods of remission. To expand on previous research, the current study investigated cross-modal emotion perception, that is, matching of facial emotion and emotional prosody in remitted BD patients. Methods: Fifty-nine outpatients with BD and 45 healthy volunteers were included into a cross-sectional study. Cross-modal emotion perception was investigated by using two subtests out of the Comprehensive Affective Testing System (CATS). Results: Compared to control subjects patients were impaired in matching sad (p < .001) and angry emotional prosody (p = .034) to one of five emotional faces exhibiting the corresponding emotion and significantly more frequently matched sad emotional prosody to happy faces (p < .001) and angry emotional prosody to neutral faces (p = .017). In addition, patients were impaired in matching neutral emotional faces to the emotional prosody of one of three sentences (p = .006) and significantly more often matched neutral faces to sad emotional prosody (p = .014). Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that, even during periods of symptomatic remission, patients suffering from BD are impaired in matching facial emotion and emotional prosody. As this type of emotion processing is relevant in everyday life, our results point to the necessity to provide specific training programs to improve psychosocial outcomes. (JINS, 2019, 25, 336–342)

Type
Regular Research
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2019 

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Combined Processing of Facial and Vocal Emotion in Remitted Patients With Bipolar I Disorder
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