Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-x64cq Total loading time: 0.271 Render date: 2022-05-24T15:13:13.619Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Bimanual-Vertical Hand Movements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 June 2011

Jay C. Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Changwon Fatima Hospital, Changwon, Republic of Korea Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Matthew L. Cohen*
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
John Williamson
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
Brandon Burtis
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
Kenneth M. Heilman
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Matthew L. Cohen, P.O. Box 100165, Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610. E-mail: mlcohen@phhp.ufl.edu

Abstract

Patients often demonstrate attentional and action-intentional biases in both the transverse and coronal planes. In addition, when making forelimb movements in the transverse plane, normal participants also have spatial and magnitude asymmetries, but forelimb spatial asymmetries have not been studied in coronal space. Thus, to learn if when normal people make vertical movements they have right–left spatial and magnitude biases, seventeen healthy, blindfolded volunteers had their hands (holding pens) placed vertically in their midsagittal plane, 10 inches apart, on pieces of paper positioned above, below, and at eye-level. Participants were asked to move their hands together vertically and meet in the middle. Participants demonstrated less angular deviation in the below-eye condition than in the other spatial conditions, when moving down than up, and with their right than left hand. Movements toward eye level from upper or lower space were also more accurate than movements in the other directions. Independent of hand, lines were longer with downward than upward movements and the right hand moved more distance than the left. These attentional-intentional asymmetries may be related to gravitational force, hand-hemispheric dominance, and spatial “where” asymmetries; however, the mechanisms accounting for these asymmetries must be ascertained by future research. (JINS, 2011, 17, 732–739)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bálint, R. (1909). Seelenlähmung des ‘schauens’, optische ataxie, räumliche störung der aufmerksamkeit. Monattsschrifte für Psychiatrische Neurologie, 25, 5181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barrett, A., Buxbaum, L., Coslett, H., Edwards, E., Heilman, K., Hillis, A., Robertson, I. (2006). Cognitive rehabilitation interventions for neglect and related disorders: Moving from bench to bedside in stroke patients. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 18(7), 12231236. doi:10.1162/jocn.2006.18.7.1223CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bonino, D., Ricciardi, E., Sani, L., Gentili, C., Vanello, N., Guazzelli, M., Pietrini, P. (2008). Tactile spatial working memory activates the dorsal extrastriate cortical pathway in congenitally blind individuals. Archives Italiennes de Biologie, 146, 122146.Google ScholarPubMed
Bowers, D., Heilman, K.M. (1980). Pseudoneglect: Effects of hemispace on a tactile line bisection task. Neuropsychologia, 18, 491498.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chokron, S., Colliot, P., Atzeni, T., Bartolomeo, P., Ohlmann, T. (2004). Active versus passive proprioceptive straight-ahead pointing in normal subjects. Brain and Cognition, 55(2), 290294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cohen, M.L., Burtis, B., Williamson, J.B., Kwon, J.C., Heilman, K.M. (2010). Action-intentional spatial bias in a patient with posterior cortical atrophy. Neurocase, 16(6), 529534. doi:10.1080/13554794.2010.487827CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fujii, T., Yamadori, A., Fukatsu, R., Suzuki, K. (1996). Effects of hand-used on unilateral spatial neglect: A case study. The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine, 180, 7381.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Graff-Radford, J., Crucian, G.P., Heilman, K.M. (2006). The right arm likes to be close. Cortex, 42(5), 699704. doi:10.1016/S0010-9452(08)70407-6CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haaland, K.Y., Harrington, D.L., Knight, R.T. (1999). Spatial deficits in ideomotor limb apraxia. A kinematic analysis of aiming movements. Brain, 122(6), 11691182.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heilman, K.M., Bowers, D., Watson, R.T. (1983). Performance on hemispatial pointing task by patients with neglect syndrome. Neurology, 33, 661664.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heilman, K.M., Bowers, D., Watson, R.T. (1984). Pseudoneglect in patients with partial callosal disconnection. Brain, 107, 519532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heilman, K.M., Van den Abell, T. (1979). Right hemispheric dominance for mediating cerebral activation. Neuropsychologia, 17, 315321.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heilman, K.M., Van den Abell, T. (1980). Right hemisphere dominance for attention: The mechanism underlying hemispheric asymmetries of inattention. Neurology, 30, 327330.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heilman, K.M., Watson, R.T., Valenstein, E. (2003). Neglect and related disorders. In K.M. Heilman & E. Valenstein (Eds.), Clinical neuropsychology (4th ed., pp. 296346). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Jeong, Y., Tsao, J.W., Heilman, K.M. (2006). Callosal neglect in hydrocephalus. Neurocase, 12(6), 346349.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jewell, G., McCourt, M.E. (2000). Pseudoneglect: A review and meta-analysis of performance factors in line bisection tasks. Neuropsychologia, 38, 93110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lissauer, H. (1890). Ein Fall von SeeIenblindheit nebst conem Beitrage zur Theorie derseIben. Archiv fur Psychiatrie, 21, 222270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mark, V.W., Heilman, K.M. (1990). Bodily neglect and orientational biases in unilateral neglect syndrome and normal subjects. Neurology, 40, 640643.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCourt, M.E., Freeman, P., Tahmahkera-Stevens, C., Chaussee, M. (2001). The influence of unimanual response on pseudoneglect magnitude. Brain and Cognition, 45, 5263.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mennemeier, M., Wertman, E., Heilman, K.M. (1992). Neglect of near peripersonal space: Evidence for multidirectional attentional systems in humans. Brain, 115, 3750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oldfield, R.C. (1971). The assessment and analysis of handedness: The Edinburgh inventory. Neuropsychologia, 9, 97113.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rapcsak, S.Z., Cimino, C.R., Heilman, K.M. (1988). Altitudinal neglect. Neurology, 38, 277281.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shelton, P.A., Bowers, D., Heilman, K.M. (1990). Peripersonal and vertical neglect. Brain, 113, 191205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ungerleider, L.G., Mishkin, M. (1982). Equivalence of parieto-preoccipital subareas for visuospatial ability in monkeys. Behavioral Brain Research, 6, 4155.Google Scholar
Weintraub, S., Mesulam, M.M. (1987). Right cerebral dominance in spatial attention. Further evidence based on ipsilateral neglect. Archives of Neurology, 44, 621625.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Bimanual-Vertical Hand Movements
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Bimanual-Vertical Hand Movements
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Bimanual-Vertical Hand Movements
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *