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Affective facial and lexical expression in aprosodic versus aphasic stroke patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2005

LEE X. BLONDER
Affiliation:
Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and Dept. of Behavioral Science of the University of Kentucky, Lexington Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida
KENNETH M. HEILMAN
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
TIMOTHY KETTERSON
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
JOHN ROSENBEK
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
ANASTASIA RAYMER
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Early Child, Speech-Language Pathology and Special Education, Old Dominion University, Norfork, Virginia
BRUCE CROSSON
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
LYNN MAHER
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
ROBERT GLUECKAUF
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahasee, Florida
LESLIE GONZALEZ ROTHI
Affiliation:
Brain Research and Rehabilitation Center (BRRC), VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Abstract

Past research has shown that lesions in the left cerebral hemisphere often result in aphasia, while lesions in the right hemisphere frequently impair the production of emotional prosody and facial expression. At least 3 processing deficits might account for these affective symptoms: (1) failure to understand the conditions that evoke emotional response; (2) inability to experience emotions; (3) disruption in the capacity to encode non-verbal signals. To better understand these disorders and their underlying mechanisms, we investigated spontaneous affective communication in right hemisphere damaged (RHD) stroke patients with aprosody and left hemisphere damaged (LHD) stroke patients with aphasia. Nine aprosodic RHD patients and 14 aphasic LHD patients participated in a videotaped interview within a larger treatment protocol. Two naïve raters viewed segments of videotape and rated facial expressivity. Verbal affect production was tabulated using specialized software. Results indicated that RHD patients smiled and laughed significantly less than LHD patients. In contrast, RHD patients produced a greater percentage of emotion words relative to total words than did LHD patients. These findings suggest that impairments in emotional prosodic production and facial expressivity associated with RHD are not induced by affective–conceptual deficits or an inability to experience emotions. Rather, they likely represent channel-specific nonverbal encoding abnormalities. (JINS, 2005, 11, 677–685.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2005 The International Neuropsychological Society

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