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25 Delayed Cerebrovascular Response in Parkinson's Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2023

Sephira G. Ryman*
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Stephanie Nitschke
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Nicholas Shaff
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Kayla Julio
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Christopher Wertz
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Andrew R. Mayer
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Andrei A. Vakhtin
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Gerson Suarez Cedeno
Affiliation:
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Amanda Deligtisch
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico, Department of Neurology, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Sarah Pirio Richardson
Affiliation:
University of New Mexico, Department of Neurology, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
*
Correspondence: Sephira G. Ryman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Mind Research Network (sryman@mrn.org)
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Abstract

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Objective:

Cardiovascular risk factors and white matter hyperintensities predict the progression and severity of cognitive symptoms in PD. While controversial, emerging evidence suggests that cerebrovascular dysfunction is an etiological driver of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative conditions, highlighting a need to understand how cerebrovascular function impacts cognitive function in PD. MRI cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) paradigms provide an opportunity to measure the ability of the cerebral vessels to dilate or constrict in response to challenges. The current study evaluates whether whole brain CVR measures, degree of response (fit) and delay differ in PD with normal cognition (PD-NC) and PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) relative to healthy controls (HC). Additionally, we evaluate if these metrics are associated with cognitive performance.

Participants and Methods:

8 PD-NC, 11 PD-MCI and 11 age and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. PD participants were diagnosed with MCI based on the Movement Disorders Society Task force, Level II assessment (comprehensive assessment). Participants were asked to inhale gas enriched in CO2 to elicit a vasodilatory response while undergoing bold oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance image (MRI). Whole brain fit to an end-tidal CO2 regressor and delay were used to quantify CVR in each participant. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to evaluate group differences between HC, PD-NC, and PD-MCI in the whole brain fit and delay CVR measures accounting for age, sex, and education. Multiple regressions were conducted for each cognitive variable with whole brain fit and delay as the dependent variables adjusting for age, sex, and education.

Results:

A significant main effect of group was observed for whole brain CVR latency (F(2, 23) = 4.227; p = 0.027). Post hoc tests were not significant, though indicated a trend that PD-NC (18.14 ±1.94) and PD-MCI (18.15 ± 1.55) patients exhibited longer delays relative to HC (15.84 ± 2.37). Regression results indicated limited relationships between CVR measures and cognitive functioning.

Conclusions:

PD patients (PD-NC and PD-MCI) exhibited longer CVR delays relative to HC, suggesting a delayed vasodilatory response in PD. Examination of the association between CVR metrics and cognition were not significant, though these results should be interpreted with caution given the small sample size.

Type
Poster Session 01: Medical | Neurological Disorders | Neuropsychiatry | Psychopharmacology
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2023