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22 Cordoba Naming Test Performance and Acculturation in a Geriatric Population

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2023

Isabel C.D. Muñoz
Affiliation:
The Lundquist Institute, Torrance, CA, USA. California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA, USA.
Krissy E. Smith
Affiliation:
The Lundquist Institute, Torrance, CA, USA. California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA.
Santiago I. Espinoza
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Diana M. R. Maqueda
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Adriana C. Cuello
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Ana Paula Pena
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Carolina Garza
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Raymundo Cervantes
Affiliation:
The Lundquist Institute, Torrance, CA, USA. California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA.
Jill Razani
Affiliation:
California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA, USA.
Tara L. Victor
Affiliation:
California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, USA.
David J. Hardy
Affiliation:
Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Alberto L. Fernandez
Affiliation:
National University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina.
Natalia Lozano Acosta
Affiliation:
Tecnológico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Daniel W. Lopez-Hernandez*
Affiliation:
The Lundquist Institute, Torrance, CA, USA. University of California San Diego Health, San Diego, CA, USA
*
Correspondence: Daniel W. Lopez-Hernandez, University of California San Diego Health, wdlopez31@gmail.com
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Abstract

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Objective:

A commonly used confrontation naming task used in the United States is The Boston Naming Test (BNT). Performance differences has been found in Caucasian and ethnic minorities on the BNT. The Cordoba Naming Test (CNT) is a 30-item confrontation naming task developed in Argentina. Past research has shown acculturation levels can influence cognitive performance. Furthermore, one study evaluated geriatric gender differences on CNT performance in Spanish. Researchers reported that older male participants outperformed female participants on the CNT. To our knowledge, researchers have not evaluated ethnic differences on the CNT using a geriatric sample. The purpose of the present study was to examined CNT performance and acculturation in a Latinx and Caucasian geriatric sample. It was predicted the Caucasian group would outperform the Latinx group on the CNT. Moreover, the Caucasian group would report higher acculturation levels on the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS) compared to the Latinx group.

Participants and Methods:

The sample consisted of 9 Latinx and 11 Caucasian participants with a mean age of 66.80 (SD =6.10), with an average of 14.30 (SD = 2.00) years of education. All participants were neurologically and psychologically healthy and completed the CNT and the AMAS in English. Acculturation was measured via the AMAS English subscales (i.e., English Language, United States. Identity, United States, Competency). A series of ANCOVAs, controlling for years of education completed and gender, was used to evaluate CNT performance and acculturation.

Results:

The ethnic groups were not well demographically matched (i.e., years of education and gender).We found that the Caucasian group outperformed the Latinx group on CNT performance p = .012, ηp 2 = .34. Furthermore, the Caucasian group reported higher acculturation levels (i.e., English Language, United States, Identity, United States, Competency) compared to the Latinx group p’s < .05, ηps2 = .42-.64.

Conclusions:

To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate CNT performance between ethnic groups with a geriatric sample. As expected the Caucasian group outperformed the Latinx group on the CNT. Also, as expected the Caucasian group reported higher English acculturation levels compared to the Latinx group. Our findings are consistent with past studies showing ethnic differences on confrontational naming performance (i.e., The Boston Naming Test), favoring Caucasians. A possible explanation for group differences could have been linguistic factors (e.g., speaking multiple languages) in our Latinx group. Therefore, since our Latinx group reported lower levels of English Language, United States identity, and United States competency the Latinx group assimilation towards United States culture might of influence their CNT performance. Future studies with different ethnic groups (e.g., African-Americans) and a larger sample size should examine if ethnic differences continue to cross-validate in a geriatric sample.

Type
Poster Session 04: Aging | MCI
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2023