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Subnational Social Investment in Three European Cities: An Exploratory Comparison

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2022

GEMMA SCALISE
Affiliation:
University of Milan-Bicocca email: gemma.scalise@unimib.it
ANTON HEMERIJCK
Affiliation:
European University Institute email: anton.hemerijck@eui.eu

Abstract

With the evolution towards more service-intensive social investment welfare states across Europe, research on the institutional capacities of subnational welfare provision is increasingly relevant. Based on a comparative case analysis of three post-industrial municipalities in Europe, this article harbors a two-pronged objective: first, empirically, to show how regional and local governance capabilities are crucial to effective SI policy delivery; second, more positively, to bring out the proficiency of vertical coordination between national administration and subnational layers, alongside the critical role of horizontal policy discretion at the local level to align social benefits and capacitating services for the success of SI delivery; and, by implication, the overall responsiveness of national welfare systems to the changing nature of 21st century socioeconomic risks.

Type
Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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