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The Motivations of Domiciliary Care Providers in England: New Concepts, New Findings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2003

JEREMY KENDALL
Affiliation:
Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), LSE Health & Social Care, and Centre for Civil Society, London School of Economics & Political Science
TIHANA MATOšEVIC
Affiliation:
PSSRU, LSE Health & Social Care
JULIEN FORDER
Affiliation:
PSSRU, LSE Health & Social Care
MARTIN KNAPP
Affiliation:
PSSRU, LSE Health & Social Care; and Director and Professor of Health Economics, Centre for the Economics of Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London
BRIAN HARDY
Affiliation:
Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds
PATRICIA WARE
Affiliation:
Nuffield Institute, University of Leeds

Abstract

The independent sector domiciliary care market has always been an integral part of the social care system in England, but has become especially important in recent years. Its smooth running is crucial for the delivery of an effective community care policy. This paper argues that the motivations of these providers is an important aspect of this system's functioning, and derives a typology which captures the most important ingredients which theory and practice suggest should be taken into account in this regard. Four provider types are identified; they can be labelled satisfied team players; demoralised isolates; ambivalence-experiencing go-getters; and ambivalence-experiencing quiet lifers. The categories reflect both the balance of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, and these providers' situational contexts, including the nature of the relationships developed with local authority purchasers. The latter exert exceptional power and influence in social care markets in England.

Type
Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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