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Counselling Asian Smokers: Key Considerations for a Telephone Intervention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2013

Gary J. Tedeschi
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Shu-Hong Zhu*
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Sharon E. Cummins
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Hee Shin
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
My Hanh Nguyen
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
*
Address for correspondence: Shu-Hong Zhu, Ph.D. Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, #0905 La Jolla, CA 92093-0905USA Tel: +1 (858) 300-1056 Fax: +1 (858) 300-1099 E-mail: szhu@ucsd.edu

Abstract

Detailed descriptions of effective intervention protocols for Asian smokers are uncommon which makes it difficult for others to successfully implement a protocol that has been proven to be effective. This article fills a gap by detailing such a protocol, specifically a telephone counselling intervention for Asian smokers. The protocol was tested in a large randomised trial with Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speaking smokers and was shown to significantly increase quit rates. The article describes the approach used to develop the protocol and critical components of the intervention. In addition, the paper compares data on programme participation and satisfaction among Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-speaking smokers with those for English- and Spanish-speaking smokers from two studies conducted in the US and shows that the former are no less likely to engage in counselling and no less likely to be satisfied with the process.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2013 

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