Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-fv4mn Total loading time: 0.188 Render date: 2022-06-27T00:47:10.626Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Consent and information giving in radiotherapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 December 2007

Gillian Thompson*
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer, Sheffield Hallam University and Professional Development Facilitator, Northern Centre for Cancer Treatment, Newcastle, UK
*
Correspondence to: Gillian Thompson, E-mail: G.Thompson@shu.ac.uk

Abstract

This paper explores some of the issues around implementing a consent policy within the radiotherapy department. Consent can be defined as a patient’s agreement for a health care professional to provide care. The NHS Plan1 highlighted the need for quality care centred around the patient and for changes in the way patients are asked to give their consent to treatment. This led to the Department of Health (DoH) publishing a Good Practice in Consent Implementation Guide (2001)2 for use within all NHS Trusts from 1 April 2002, which aimed to provide consistency across the NHS and provides a policy model and generic consent forms.

The policy recommends that the health professional carrying out the procedure is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the patient is genuinely consenting to what is being done, as it is they who would be held responsible in law should a case be made by a patient against a health professional. In radiotherapy, it is the Clinical Oncologist who obtains consent as they are responsible for prescribing courses of treatment; however, it is the Radiographer’s role to deliver this treatment. This paper discusses some of the issues around implementing a consent policy in terms of who can give and confirm consent, and what are the requirements for training if the patient is to receive the appropriate information before making the decision to consent to treatment.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

NHS Executive. The NHS Plan—a plan for investment. A plan for reform. NHS Executive, 2000.Google Scholar
NHS Executive. Health Service Circular. Good practice in consent—achieving the NHS Plan commitment to patient-centred consent practice. NHS Executive, 2001.Google Scholar
Gillon, R.Philosophical Medical Ethics. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons, 1986.Google ScholarPubMed
Bristol Royal Infirmary Inquiry. Learning from Bristol: the report of the public inquiry into children’s heart surgery at the Bristol Royal Infirmary 1984–1995. London: Stationery Office, 2001. Available online at URL: www.bristol-inquiry.org.uk/ (accessed on 3/10/07)Google Scholar
Dimond, B.Legal aspects of obtaining consent 22: nurses’ position when obtaining consent. Br J Nurs 2002; 11 (4):281283.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Souhami, R, Tobias, J.Cancer and It’s Management. Fourth edition. Blackwell Publishers, 2002.Google Scholar
Aveyard, H.The requirement for informed consent prior to nursing care procedures. J Adv Nurs 2002; 37 (3):243249.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
The College of Radiographers. Statements for Professional Conduct. London: College of Radiographers, 2002.Google Scholar
Houghton, DJ, Williams, S, Bennett, JD, Back, G, Jones, AS.Informed consent: patients’ and junior doctors’ perceptions of the consent procedure. Clin Otolaryngol 1997; 22:515518.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust. Policy for consent to Examination or Treatment, 2004. Available online at URL: sol;intranet/Policies/operational/consent%20policy%20v2.pdf (last accessed on 3/10/07).Google Scholar
Department of Health Consent Forms. Available online at URL: www.dh.gov.uk/en/Policyandguidance/Healthandsocialcaretopics/Consent/Consentgeneralinformation/DH_4015950 (last accessed on 3/10/07).Google Scholar
Lupton, M.Consent and the law. Curr Obstet Gynaecol 2004; 14:363367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chadha, NK, Pratap, R, Narula, A.Consent processes in common nose and throat procedures. J Laryngol Otol 2003; 117:536539.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fallowfield, L, Jenkins, V.Effective communication skills are the key to good cancer care. Eur J Cancer 1999; 35 (11):15921597.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jimison, HB, Sher, PP, Appleyard, R, LeVernois, Y.The Use of Multimedia in the Informed Consent Process. J Am Med Inform Assoc 1998; 5 (3):245256.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moumjid, N, Carrere, M, Charavel, M, Bremond, A.Clinical issues in shared decision-making applied to breast cancer. Health Expect 2003; 6:222227.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davis, C.Psychosocial needs of women with breast cancer—how can social workers make a difference? Health Soc Work 2004; 29 (4):330334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lockey, V. Client Enquiry Summaries—Newcastle NCCT. Unpublished Material, 2004.Google Scholar
Verhaak, CM, Kraaimaat, FW, Staps, ACJ, van Daahl, WAJ.Informed consent in palliative radiotherapy: participation of patients and proxies in treatment decisions. Patient Educ Couns 2000; 41 (1):6371.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Griffith, R.Consent to examination and treatment 1: the capable adult patient. Nurse Prescribing 2004; 2 (4):177179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Childrens Act (1989). HMSO. Available online at URL: www.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1989/Ukpga_19890041_en_1.htm (last accessed on 3/10/07).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Consent and information giving in radiotherapy
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Consent and information giving in radiotherapy
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Consent and information giving in radiotherapy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *