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Payment by Results in Nineteenth-Century British Education: A Study in How Priorities Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2016

Henry Midgley*
Affiliation:
London, UK

Abstract

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Copyright
Copyright © Donald Critchlow and Cambridge University Press 2016 

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Footnotes

I am very grateful to the comments of the anonymous reviewers, Dr. Thomas Packer, Matthew Sinclair, and Alex Scharaschkin on this article. The flaws in it are my own. The article reflects my own views and not the views of any institution to which I am attached.

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