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The type species of Lingulella (Cambrian Brachiopoda)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015

Mark D. Sutton
Affiliation:
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Wales Cardiff, PO Box 914, Cardiff CF1 3YE, Wales, UK
Michael G. Bassett
Affiliation:
2Department of Geology, National Museum of Wales, Cardiff CF1 3NP, Wales, UK
Lesley Cherns
Affiliation:
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Wales Cardiff, PO Box 914, Cardiff CF1 3YE, Wales, UK

Abstract

The poorly known type species of Lingulella, Lingula davisii M'Coy, 1851b, is redefined from new material collected from the type locality and horizon (Upper Cambrian, North Wales). Lingulella is similar to Obolus and to Ungula in its musculature mantle canals, and pseudointerareas, but has a thinner shell and irregular pits over its internal surface, concentrated in the visceral areas. A dissolution method that can facilitate the study of lingulate brachiopods preserved in clastic lithologies is described, and its wider adoption is recommended in order to reveal diagnostic morphological characters.

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Research Article
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Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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