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A teratological pygidium of the Upper Cambrian trilobite Eugonocare (Pseudeugonocare) bispinatum from the Machari Formation, Korea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Jeong Gu Lee
Affiliation:
1Department of Geological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Korea, <leejg1@hotmail.com>, <dkchoi@snu.ac.kr>
Duck K. Choi
Affiliation:
1Department of Geological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Korea, <leejg1@hotmail.com>, <dkchoi@snu.ac.kr>
Brian R. Pratt
Affiliation:
2Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada, <brian.pratt@usask.ca>
Corresponding

Extract

Abundant examples of exoskeletal abnormalities have been known in various trilobites since Portlock's (1843) first report on a teratological pygidium of Phillipsia ornata (cf. Babcock, 2000). Owen (1985) and Babcock (1993) recognized three types of trilobite malformations: healed injuries, teratological conditions, and pathological conditions. It is not always easy, however, to distinguish between the various types of malformations, especially in case of teratological or pathological conditions. In general, healed injuries are considered to have resulted from trauma during molting (Walcott, 1883; Whittington, 1956; Henningsmoen, 1975; Snajdr, 1981; Owen, 1983; Ramsköld, 1984) or wounds by predatory attack (Ludvigsen, 1977; Rudkin, 1979; Ŝnajdr, 1979, 1981; Owen, 1985; Conway Morris and Jenkins, 1985; Babcock, 1993; Pratt, 1998). Many healed injuries are indicated by broken spine stumps, indented and cicatrized edges of exoskeletons, and callused or regenerated exoskeleton around the broken surface (Ŝnajdr, 1981; Owen, 1983; Babcock, 1993). Teratological conditions are represented primarily by the irregular development of glabellar lobes, cephalic borders, and pygidial border spines, and anomalous number of segments on the thorax and pygidium. For example, Owen (1980) described a teratological cranidium of Calyptaulax norvegicus with two additional lateral glabellar lobes between the l p and 2p lobes. On the other hand, pathological conditions are marked by gall-like swellings and vermiform borings on exoskeletons that are thought to have been caused by diseases or parasitic infestation (Lochman, 1941; Ŝnajdr, 1978; Conway Morris, 1981; Owen, 1985).

Type
Paleontological Note
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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References

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A teratological pygidium of the Upper Cambrian trilobite Eugonocare (Pseudeugonocare) bispinatum from the Machari Formation, Korea
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A teratological pygidium of the Upper Cambrian trilobite Eugonocare (Pseudeugonocare) bispinatum from the Machari Formation, Korea
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