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Jaws and radula of the Carboniferous ammonoid Cravenoceras

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015

Kazushige Tanabe
Affiliation:
Geological Institute, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113, Japan
Royal H. Mapes
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens 45701

Abstract

A well-preserved mouth apparatus consisting of jaws and a radula was found in situ within the body chamber of the goniatite Cravenoceras fayettevillae Gordon, 1965 (Neoglyphiocerataceae: Cravenoceratidae), from the middle Chesterian (Upper Mississippian) of Arkansas. Both upper and lower jaws consist of a black material. The lower jaw is characterized by a widely opened larger outer lamella and a shorter inner lamella. The upper jaw is fragmental. The radula is preserved in the anterior portion of the buccal space and comprises a series of tooth elements. Each transverse tooth row consists of seven teeth (a rhachidian and pairs of two lateral and one marginal teeth), with a pair of marginal plates. This arrangement is typical of radulae of other ammonoids of Carboniferous to Cretaceous age, coleoids, and the orthoconic “nautiloid” Michelinoceras (Silurian, Michelinocerida), suggesting a phylogenetic affinity among them.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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