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Cephalopods from the late Eocene Hoko River Formation, northwestern Washington

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015

Richard L. Squires*
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, California State University, Northridge 91330

Abstract

Rare specimens of the nautiloids Nautilus and Aturia and extremely rare specimens of a sepiamorph sepiid are described from the late Eocene Hoko River Formation, northern Olympic Peninsula, Washington. The well-preserved partial phragmocones are from channel-fill clastics deposited on the inner and middle slopes of a submarine-fan system.

The Nautilus specimen is allied to N. cookanum Whitfield from middle Eocene strata, New Jersey, and is probably conspecific with Nautilus sp. (Miller) from late Eocene strata, northwestern Oregon, both of which were previously assigned to Eutrephoceras. This is the first record of Nautilus in the northeastern Pacific.

The Aturia specimen is tentatively identified as A. cf. A. alabamensis (Morton), a species previously only known from late Eocene strata in the Atlantic-Gulf Coastal area and northeastern Mexico. Aturia alabamensis may be the same as numerous Eocene North American aturiid species.

The two sepiamorph sepiid specimens resemble Belosepia Voltz but are probably generically distinct. They are only the second record of sepiids in the Eocene of the northeastern Pacific.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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