Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-hlvcg Total loading time: 0.199 Render date: 2022-07-02T05:34:42.433Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Numerical Adaptations of Captain Sumner's 1837 journey: a context for teaching celestial navigation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 April 2022

Tom Bensky*
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California93407, USA

Abstract

In an effort to add context to a classroom lesson on celestial navigation, we present a numerical adaptation of Captain T.H. Sumner's 1837 journey into St. George's Channel. The adaptation is programmed into a ‘live’ web-based map. This allows for a flexible and highly visual presentation that highlights two important topics in celestial navigation: the origin of the line of position and the scale of maps. Considerations driving the numerical adaptation are discussed, as is as an overview of a classroom lesson we have been using.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Royal Institute of Navigation

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Astronomy and Astrophysics. (2020). ASTR 324. http://catalog.calpoly.edu/coursesaz/astr/. Accessed 16 July 2016.Google Scholar
Bensky, T. (2013). Longitude, Time, and Navigation. 2nd Edition. Amazon.com Services LLC., Seattle, WA, USA.Google Scholar
Bensky, T. (2018). Teaching and learning celestial navigation using google maps. Journal of Navigation, 71(2), 281298. doi:10.1017/S0373463317000777CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burch, D. (2017). Celestial Navigation: A Complete Home Study Course. 2nd Edition. Starpath publishing, Seattle, WA. USA.Google Scholar
Karl, J. (2011). Celestial Navigation in the GPS Age. Paradise Cay Publications, Blue Lake, CA, USA.Google Scholar
Google Maps, . (2015). Google Maps. http://maps.google.com. Accessed 10 September 2015.Google Scholar
NASA. (2020). Horizons Web-Interface. https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi. Accessed 6 August 2020. This gives the declination of the sun to be 23.43S.Google Scholar
NIMA. (2015). The American Practical Navigator. Paradise Cay Publications, Blue Lake, CA USA. A 2017 update to this book is available by searching for ‘Bowditch’ at http://www.nga.milGoogle Scholar
NOAA. (2020). NOAA Solar Calculator. http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/grad/solcalc/. Accessed 6 August 2020. This gives the declination of the sun to be 23.38S.Google Scholar
Open Street Maps. (2020). Open Street Maps. https://www.openstreetmap.org/. Access 7 September 2020.Google Scholar
PyEphem. (2020). Astronomical Ephemeris for Python. http://www.ascl.net/1112.014. Accessed 6 February 2021.Google Scholar
Richardson, R. (1943). Captain Thomas Hubbard Sumner, 1807–1876. Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 55(324), 136144. Retrieved 17 August 2020, from www.jstor.org/stable/40669797CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schlereth, H. (2000). Celestial Navigation in a Nutshell. Sherdian House, Inc., Grand Rapids, MI USA.Google Scholar
Sobel, D. (2007). Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time. Walker Books.Google Scholar
Stackoverflow. (2020). How to calculate the latlng of a point a certain distance away from another? http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2637023/how-to-calculate-the-latlng-of-a-point-a-certain-distance-away-from-another. Accessed July 2020.Google Scholar
Umland. (2020). Long-term Almanac for sun, Moon, and Polaris V1.11. https://www.celnav.de/longterm.htm.12pm at Greenwich. At 10:15am, the sun's GHA is (12-10:15) = 1.75 Hours west of Greenwich, which is 1.75×15 = 26.26°W of Greenwich, and (360°-26.26°=333.74°), which is consistent with the stated GHA.Google Scholar
Vanvaerenbergh, M. and Ifland, P. (2003). Line of Position Navigation, Sumner and Saint-Hilaire, the two Pillars of Modern Celestial Navigation. Unlimited Publishing, Nashville, IN USA.Google Scholar
Williams, J. E. D. (1994). From Sails to Satellites: The Origin and Development of Navigational Science. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
Wolfram. (2020). See Mathematica at http://www.wolfram.com. Accessed 2018-Jan to 2020-Aug.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Numerical Adaptations of Captain Sumner's 1837 journey: a context for teaching celestial navigation
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Numerical Adaptations of Captain Sumner's 1837 journey: a context for teaching celestial navigation
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Numerical Adaptations of Captain Sumner's 1837 journey: a context for teaching celestial navigation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *