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The Relationship Between Disturbance of Liver Function and Mental Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2018

P. Berkenau*
Affiliation:
The Warneford Hospital, Oxford

Extract

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to correlate results obtained from liver tests with the nosological demarcation of psychoses. The knowledge of the outstanding importance of the liver in general metabolism (it provides 12% of the turnover of energy of the body) and of its relation to some organic diseases of brain has been the subject of numerous investigations. Expectation of finding the starting-point of any disease in the liver, however, will at first not be placed too high if one recollects that every gland is only part of a system. Even where the symptoms of liver or other glandular impairment are characteristic for limited groups of psychoses deductions must be guarded, and the discovery of an unequivocal bodily symptom does not mean elucidation of the aetiology of a mental disease.

Type
Part I.—Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1940 

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