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Three-Dimensional Stokes Flow Solution Using Combined Boundary Element and Finite Element Methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

D.L. Young*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering & Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
Y.H. Liu*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering & Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
T.I. Eldho*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering & Hydrotech Research Institute, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
*
*Professor
**Graduate student
***Postdoc
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Abstract

This paper describes a model using boundary element and finite element methods for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible viscous flows in slow motion, using velocity-vorticity variables. The method involves the solution of diffusion-advection type vorticity equations for vorticity whose solenoidal vorticity components are obtained by solving a Poisson equation involving the velocity and vorticity components. The Poisson equations are solved using boundary elements and the vorticity diffusion type equations are solved using finite elements and both are combined. Here the results of Stokes flow with very low Reynolds number, in a typical cavity flow are presented and compared with other model results. The combined BEM-FEM model has been found to be efficient and satisfactory.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 1999

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References

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