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Effects of Nano-Nozzles Cross-Sectional Geometry on Fluid Flow: Molecular Dynamic Simulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2017

H. Nowruzi
Affiliation:
Department of Maritime EngineeringAmirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic)Tehran, Iran
H. Ghassemi
Affiliation:
Department of Maritime EngineeringAmirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic)Tehran, Iran
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Abstract

Nano-nozzles are an essential part of the nano electromechanical systems (NEMS). Cross-sectional geometry of nano-nozzles has a significant role on the fluid flow inside them. So, main purpose of the present study is related to the effects of different symmetrical cross-sections on the fluid flow behavior inside of nano-nozzles. To this accomplishment, five different cross-sectional geometries (equilateral triangle, square, regular hexagon, elliptical and circular) are investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In addition, TIP4P is used for atomistic water model. In order to evaluate the fluid flow behavior, non-dimensional physical parameters such as Fanning friction factor, velocity profile and density number are analyzed. Obtained results are shown that the flow behavior characteristics appreciably depend on the geometry of nano-nozzle's cross-section. Velocity profile and density number for five different cross sections of nano-nozzle at three various measurement gauges are presented and discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 2018 

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