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Comparison of the Propulsion Performance of Aerospike and Bell-Shaped Nozzle Using Hydrogen Peroxide Monopropellant Under Sea-Level Condition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2018

A. Lai
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
S. S. Wei
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
C. H. Lai
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
J. L. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
Y. H. Liao
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
J. S. Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics National Chiao Tung UniversityHsinchu, Taiwan
Y. S. Chen
Affiliation:
Aerospace Engineering TiSPACE IncorporatedMiaoli, Taiwan
Corresponding
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Abstract

This study investigates numerically the performance of applying aerospike nozzle in a hydrogen peroxide mono-propellant propulsion system. A set of governing equations, including continuity, momentum, energy and species conservation equations with extended k-ε turbulence equations, are solved using the finite-volume method. The hydrogen peroxide mono-propellant is assumed to be fully decomposed into water vapor and oxygen after flowing through a catalyst bed before entering the nozzle. The aerospike nozzle is expected to have high performance even in deep throttling cases due to its self-compensating characteristics in a wide range of ambient pressure environments. The results show that the thrust coefficient efficiency (Cf,η) of this work exceeds 90% of the theoretical value with a nozzle pressure ratio (PR) in the range of 20 ~ 45. Many complex gas dynamics phenomena in the aerospike nozzle are found and explained in the paper. In addition, performance of the aerospike nozzle is compared with that of the bell-shape nozzle.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 2018 

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Comparison of the Propulsion Performance of Aerospike and Bell-Shaped Nozzle Using Hydrogen Peroxide Monopropellant Under Sea-Level Condition
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Comparison of the Propulsion Performance of Aerospike and Bell-Shaped Nozzle Using Hydrogen Peroxide Monopropellant Under Sea-Level Condition
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