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Boundary Weight Functions for Cracks in Three-Dimensional Finite Bodies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

Chien-Ching Ma*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
I-Kuang Shen*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, R.O.C.
*
*Professor
**Graduate student
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Abstract

An efficient boundary weight function method for the determination of mode I stress intensity factors in a three-dimensional cracked body with arbitrary shape and subjected to arbitrary loading is presented in this study. The functional form of the boundary weight functions are successfully demonstrated by using the least squares fitting procedure. Explicit boundary weight functions are presented for through cracks in rectangular finite bodies. If the stress distribution of a cut out rectangular cracked body from any arbitrary shape of cracked body subjected to arbitrary loading is determined, the mode I stress intensity factors for the cracked body can be obtained from the predetermined boundary weight functions by a simple integration. Comparison of the calculated results with some solutions by other workers from the literature confirms the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed boundary weight function method.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 1999

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References

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