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Transformation Mechanism from Carbon Nanotubes to n-diamond

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2005

Bin Wen*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, People’s Republic of China
Tingju Li
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Special Processing of Raw Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, People’s Republic of China
Chuang Dong
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, People’s Republic of China
Junze Jin
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Special Processing of Raw Materials, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, People’s Republic of China
*
a) Address all correspondence to these authors. a) e-mail: wenbin@dlut.edu.cn
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Abstract

Nanocrystal n-diamond particles were synthesized after a pyrogenation of carbon nanotubes and colloidal Fe(OH)3 at atmospheric pressure. The product was investigated with x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and differential thermal analysis. The results indicate that the n-diamond can be synthesized with the carbon nanotubes as carbon source. The formation mechanism of the n-diamond is suggested in this paper. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, α–Fe, γ–Fe, and then liquid iron. When carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, graphite separated out of the liquid iron. With the decrease of temperature, the carbon in γ–Fe is separated out, and the n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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