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Surfactant and thioacetamide-assisted reflux synthesis of Bi2S3 nanowires

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 August 2014

Weidong Xiang
Affiliation:
College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035, China
Yuxiang Yang*
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science & Technology, 200237, China
Junya Yang
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science & Technology, 200237, China
Hongming Yuan
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China
Jie An
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science & Technology, 200237, China
Jing Wei
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science & Technology, 200237, China
Xiangnong Liu
Affiliation:
Analysis Test Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: yxyang@ecust.edu.cn
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Abstract

Pure single-crystalline bismuth (III) sulfide (Bi2S3) nanowires with lengths of the long and short axes being 1.58–1.75 μm and 40 nm were prepared by a simple surfactant-assisted reflux method in the presence of thioacetamide, which served as both the sulfur source and a “soft template” in the formation of bismuth sulfide nanostructures. The effects of different surfactant, surfactant molecular weight, solvent medium, and sulfur source on the morphology, structure, and phase composition of the as-prepared Bi2S3 products were discussed. The formation of long Bi2S3 nanowires was probably via the mechanism of pyrolysis of bismuth (III) sulfide complexes dimer and continuous growth of crystalline nuclei along rod-shaped micelles originated from “soft-template” of polyethylene glycol (PEG-800). Besides, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopic (UV-Vis), and photoluminescent (PL) Bi2S3 band features indicated that the nanowires have excellent optical properties, in the optical field of potential applications.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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