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Structure manufacturing of proton-conducting organic–inorganic hybrid silicophosphite membranes by solventless synthesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

Yomei Tokuda*
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Satoshi Oku
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Teppei Yamada
Affiliation:
Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan; and Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
Masahide Takahashi
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan; and Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531, Japan
Toshinobu Yoko
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Hiroshi Kitagawa
Affiliation:
Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan; and Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
Yoshikatsu Ueda
Affiliation:
Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: tokuda@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp
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Abstract

We have developed a new class of proton-conducting organic–inorganic hybrid silicophosphite membranes, produced by ethanol condensation of organically modified alkoxysilanes and anhydrous vinylphosphonic acid under solventless, catalyst-free, low-temperature, one-pot conditions. The membranes synthesized in this study are crack-free, large, and flexible, and they exhibit good thermal stability up to intermediate temperatures (~218 °C). Structural analyses using 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared measurements revealed that ethanol condensation produced an inorganic alternating copolymer structure, Si–O–P, with a phosphole group, and successive polymerization between vinyl and/or methacryl groups enabled these structures to connect with each other. In this way, it is possible to achieve structure manufacturing of inorganic–organic networks. The proton conductivities of the hybrids are as high as 5.2 × 10−3 S/cm at 85 °C under 80% relative humidity.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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