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Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of electric domains in ferroelectric materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

MengLu Qian
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Acoustics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China
XianMei Wu
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Acoustics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China
QingRui Yin
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050, People's Republic of China
BingYing Zhang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050, People's Republic of China
John H. Cantrell
Affiliation:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 231, Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199
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Abstract

Electric domains in single-crystal and polycrystalline barium titanate (BaTiO3) have been observed by use of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM). A model is presented of the SEAM signal generation, spatial resolution, and contrast mechanism associated with the imaging of electric domains in ferroelectric materials. The SEAM signal is found to depend directly on the sum of the piezoelectric coupling coefficient and spontaneous polarization of the domain, on the charge density of the electron beam interaction volume, and inversely on both the permittivity and the elastic constants of the material. Application of the model to BaTiO3 yields a contrast of roughly 3.5% from 90° domain structures and 6.8% from 180° domain structures.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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