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Preparation and structure of organic-inorganic hybrid low-melting phosphite glasses from phosphonic acid H3PO3

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Haruki Niida
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Masahide Takahashi*
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Takashi Uchino
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
Toshinobu Yoko
Affiliation:
Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: masahide@noncry.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp
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Abstract

An organic–inorganic, hybrid, low-melting glass free of pollution elements such as Pb and F was prepared through nonaqueous acid-base reactions of Si—Cl + P—OH ⇉ Si—O—P + HCl⇈ and Sn—Cl + P—OH ⇉ Sn—O—P + HCl⇈ using phosphonic acid (H3PO3), dimethyldichlorosilane (Me2SiCl2), and tin(II)chloride (SnCl2) as starting materials. Transparent, colorless, and homogeneous phosphite glass was successfully obtained. The formation of P—O—Si linkage and the disappearance of P—OH were confirmed by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. With increasing Si content, the glass-transition temperature decreased, reflecting the decrease of the average linkage number per one cation.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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References

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